Inspiration Outing @ The Broad

July 08, 2016  •  2 Comments

I am "classical" by training: my formal education, literature, drawing and painting, music (vocal, instruments, theory)... even science, as I knew it, was classical, or some called it "old school". I even joked with a friend that I was suited to live in the Renaissance or the Industrial Revolution periods. Don't get me wrong -- I do have a degree in Computer Science. Hm... even that sounded last century! LOL.

I must confess that my knowledge of "contemporary art" needs some serious updating; after all, Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Edgar Degas, Pablo Picasso, Georgia O'Keeffe, and Ansel Adams cannot still be considered "present-day". I can sort of recognize Keith Haring and Andy Warhol's work, and that's about it. 

Thanks to Eli and Edythe Broad, I can now enjoy their private collection of postwar and contemporary art at The Broad museum in downtown Los Angeles. I was introduced to the creations of Jeff Koons, Robert Therrien, and Roy Lichtenstein. It was also my first time to see Takashi Murakami's work other than a Louis Vuitton bag. The building itself is definitely a work of art, with curved surfaces inside and a geometric "veil" outside.

Lobby of the BroadLobby of the Broad Elevator Shaft of the BroadElevator Shaft of the Broad

The Broad's lobby and shaft of the cylindrical glass elevator

 

Jeff Koon's Balloon DogJeff Koon's Balloon Dog (Blue) Jeff Koon's TulipsJeff Koon's Tulips

Jeff Koon's Balloon Dog (Blue) and Tulips

 

No Title by Robert TherrienNo Title by Robert Therrien Under the Table by Robert TherrienUnder the Table by Robert Therrien

Robert Therrien's Untitled (plates) and Under The Table

 

Goldfish Bowl by Roy LichtensteinGoldfish Bowl by Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Lichtenstein's Goldfish Bowl

 

The diversity of subjects and media was mind-blowing. (There was even a glass case of skeletons of birds. Yes, different aviary friends and more.) I have yet to explore the ideas and historical context behind each piece, but I do have a conclusion: art is a very subjective and fluid notion. It transcends gender, race, culture, age, religion, political view, and whatever other ways a person may be defined by. It has evolved across media and influenced (and been influenced by) our way of life. I should seek to imprint my beliefs and my world onto my photographic pieces. 

By the way, don't be deceived by the relatively empty space in my photos. They are the direct results of selective angles and incredible patience in the midst of summer crowds. I have yet to see Yayoi Kusama's Infinity Mirrored Room, which was a six-hour wait!!! There are multiple audio tours if you download the mobile app. I am sure I'd be back soon. Wouldn't it be great if I ever get an opportunity to shoot for the museum?!?

 

Information:

The Broad    www.thebroad.org
Free Admission. Advanced tickets available online (recommended), or same-day standby at the museum.

Note: All photos on this page are for personal enjoyment only. Taken with an iPhone 6Plus. 


Comments

Rebecca Li Photography
Teresa, thank you for your kind words. You are also very perceptive. In fact, Robert Therrien really intended for the audience to feel like "Alice in Wonderland."

Mobile phone cameras are still nothing like digital single lens reflex (DSLR) cameras, but quality has improved so much that they are credible image-capturing devices. Following the revolutions brought about by the printing press, radio, and television, I wonder how far the ubiquity of media technology -- text, still pictures and videos included -- would impact our lives beyond social media.

On another note, after posting the original blog, I thought perhaps my work already reflects my past and current beliefs and values. Perhaps I just didn't know enough to ask the right question to analyze and distill my own motivations and expressions. In any case, values and beliefs change as life journeys on. I am looking forward to growing creatively and spiritually to produce work worthy of our times.
Teresa Keh(non-registered)
What a amazing series of shots! I would not have believed they were shot with the camera of a mobile phone if you had not said so. I particularly appreciate the angle you took of of the brilliantly colored tulips contrasted by the almost B&W background. The oversized objects make me feel like I'm in "Alice in Wonderland".
Your conclusion also resonates with me. Can't wait to see more of your future photos that reflect your beliefs.
Great work. Keep going.
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